Dry Curing Sausage

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5 years 9 months ago - 5 years 9 months ago #3631 by Jim
Replied by Jim on topic Dry Curing Sausage
Can't see the reason it will not work. We made some smaller chorizo and it turned out quite well.
BTW, Supiman what starter culture did you use for this?


Last edit: 5 years 9 months ago by Jim.

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5 years 9 months ago #3632 by Supiman
Replied by Supiman on topic Dry Curing Sausage
Well I hope it works. My only concern is if there is air trapped in side, i would think they will spoil. Did you use the fridge with the dry bag and it work for you? I only use kosher salt and seasoning. That is how my grandparents do it. When other additives are used to me it tastes processed. I prefer the taste of just salt and seasonings......

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5 years 9 months ago #3633 by Supiman
Replied by Supiman on topic Dry Curing Sausage
Where are yours hanging? In the living room? Lol......

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5 years 9 months ago #3634 by nepas
Replied by nepas on topic Dry Curing Sausage
Did you use cure #2?
Cure 2 is essential for properly dry cured meat weather it be in a natural casing or a Drybag Steak bag.

CURES - Cures are used in sausage products for color and flavor development as well as retarding the development of bacteria in
the low temperature environment of smoked meats.
Salt and sugar both cure meat by osmosis. In addition to drawing the water from the food, they dehydrate and kill the bacteria that make food spoil. In general, though, use of the word "cure" refers to processing the meat with either sodium nitrite or sodium nitrate.
The primary and most important reason to use cures is to prevent BOTULISM POISONING (Food poisoning). It is very important that any kind of meat or sausage that will be cooked and smoked at low temperature be cured. To trigger botulism poisoning, the requirements are quite simple - lack of oxygen, the presence of moisture, and temperatures in range of 40-140° F. When smoking meats, the heat and smoke eliminates the oxygen. The meats have moisture and are traditionally smoked and cooked in the low ranges of 90 to 185° F. As you can see, these are ideal conditions for food poisoning if you don't use cures. There are two types of commercially used cures.

Prague Powder #2
Used to dry-cure products. Prague powder #2 is a mixture of 1 part sodium nitrite, .64 parts sodium nitrate and 16 parts salt. (1 oz. of sodium nitrite with .64 oz. of sodium nitrate to each lb. of salt.)
It is primarily used in dry-curing Use with products that do not require cooking, smoking, or refrigeration. This cure, which is sodium nitrate, acts like a time release, slowly breaking down into sodium nitrite, then into nitric oxide. This allows you to dry cure products that take much longer to cure. A cure with sodium nitrite would dissipate too quickly.
Use 1 oz. of cure for 25 lbs. of meat or 1 level teaspoon of cure for 5 lbs. of meat when mixing with meat.
When using a cure in a brine solution, follow a recipe.

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5 years 9 months ago #3635 by Jim
Replied by Jim on topic Dry Curing Sausage
Well, they hung in the kitchen for 72 hours @65F for the fermentation stage (didn't have any humidity controlled space to ferment) and then dried in the fridge. Cure #2 and T-SPX starter culture were used in the Spanish style dry chorizo. Turned out pretty well..... More to follow.

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5 years 9 months ago #3639 by nepas
Replied by nepas on topic Dry Curing Sausage
FYI on Bactoferm agents.

Bactoferm™ LHP - Fast: 5.0 pH drop in 2 days) LHP is a freeze-dried culture well suited for all fermented sausages where extra fast acidification is desired. This culture is recommended for the production of fermented, dry sausages with a pronounced sourly flavor note needing about 3 weeks or less to complete.. Each 42-gram packet of LHP will do 500 pounds (225 kilo) of meat. You can use half of the packet in 100 pounds of meat, and refreeze remaining culture. Use at least 1/4 of the packet in any production under 100 pounds of meat.

Bactoferm™ F-RM-52 - Medium: 5.0 pH in 4 days) F-RM-52 is a freeze-dried culture well suited for all fermented sausages where a relatively fast acidification is desired. The culture is recommended for the production of North European types of fermented, dry sausages with a sourly flavor note. Each 25-gram packet of Bactoferm™ F-RM-52 will do 220 pounds (100 kilo) of meat. You can use the whole packet in 100 pounds of meat or use half of the packet and refreeze remaining culture.

Bactoferm™ T-SPX - Slow - Assists with drying a month or more) Also: Semi Dry Cured T-SPX is a freeze-dried culture well suited for all fermented sausages where a relatively mild acidification is desired. T-SPX is particularly recommended for the production of Southern European type of sausages, low in acidity with an aromatic flavor. The culture is suitable for molded as well as smoked fermented sausages. (Semi Dry Cured) Each 25-gram packet of Bactoferm™ T-SPX will do 440 pounds (200 kilo) of meat. You can use the whole packet in 100 pounds of meat or use half of the packet and refreeze remaining culture. Use ¼ of a packet in any production under 50 pounds of meat.

Bactoferm™ F-LC - Fast, extra fast or slow - Fermentation time is temperature dependent – With added Listeria protection F-LC meat culture with bioprotective properties for production of fermented sausages with fast or slow production times. F-LC is recommended for the production of all types of fermented sausages. Depending on fermentation temperature, acidification is slow, fast or extra fast. Can be used for slow, traditional fermentation when environment is near 80F and will also rapidly acidify in high fermentation (US Style) temperatures of near 115 F. F-LC is a mixed culture containing Pediococcus acidilactici, Lactobacillus curvatus and Staphylococcus xylosus. P. acidilactici ensures reliable acidification whereas S. xylosus results in strong flavor development and a good, stable color. Due to bacteriocin production both L. curvatus and P. acidilactici contribute to suppressing growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Each 25-gram packet of Bactoferm™ F-LC will treat 220 pounds (100 kilo) of meat. You can use the whole packet in 100 pounds of meat or use half of the packet and refreeze remaining culture. Use ¼ of a packet in any production under 50 pounds of meat.

Mold 600 Bactoferm - Previously M-EK-4) Meat culture for production of molded dried sausages wi2h a white/cream colored appearance. Mold-600 is a single strain culture containing spores of Penicillium nalgiovense in a convenient freeze-dried form. P. nalgiovense is a fast growing, traditional white mold culture for controlling the surface flora. Mold-600 is particularly recommended for the production of traditional sausages dried at low temperature and/or low humidity. Mold-600 suppresses the growth of undesirable organisms such as indigenous molds, yeasts and bacteria. The culture has a positive effect on the drying process by preventing the emergence of a dry rim. Furthermore, the mold degrades lactic acid during maturation resulting in a pH increase and a less sourish flavor. One pouch of freeze-dried culture is mixed into 1-2 liters of tap water atapproximately 20°C (68°F) and equilibrated for 2 hours at room temperature. The suspension is diluted in 10 liters of tap water and is then ready for use. The mold is inoculated after the stuffing (and eventually acclimatization process),

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