Cooking dry aged brisket

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1 week 3 days ago #14607 by Simon
Cooking dry aged brisket was created by Simon
I have a 6.7kilo Black angus whole packer brisket. This has been cut into 2 pieces. One piece will be aged for 35 days, the other for 45 days. I am looking for your recommendations and recipes on how I should cook these joints once they have aged.

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1 week 3 days ago #14609 by RRP
Replied by RRP on topic Cooking dry aged brisket
Well, Sir, just like ribs everyone seems to have their own favorite way of cooking a brisket and just the same no two briskets ever seem to cook the same way! One bit of advice is just remember dry aged beef will cook faster than non-dry aged beef!

The most popular method is to egg them indirect using a drip pan which will help prevent burning and drying out the meat. Dome temperature is best about 230º to 250º but not higher. Place the fat cap side up.

Choice of rub is up to your tastes whether it’s a commercial grade beef rub or say a brown sugar based one of your own making.

Time wise count on 2 to 3 hours per pound, though thickness and grade of beef used will be variables as well! One thing for certain is if cooked too fast and at too high of a temperature will almost guarantee saddle leather consistency!

Plan to monitor the meat until the internal temp reaches 195° and then using a fork test the meat by twisting the fork to see how tender it is and if it tears to your satisfaction. If still firm continue to cook to 200° internal.

Do let the meat rest for a half hour before slicing it across the grain.

Now there are variations and some people swear by getting their brisket up to 160º and then wrap them in foil, others prefer kraft paper and cook until 200º. You do run a risk though that the meat will get mushy! Also some people like to use some liquid in their drip pan, but with the BGE the added moisture is not needed – just a personal preference.

Good luck – sorry I can not give you a one size fits all answer, but producing a good brisket is a wonderful feeling!
Ron

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1 week 3 days ago #14610 by BagLady
Replied by BagLady on topic Cooking dry aged brisket
Ballistic BBQ has some really knowledgeable information on cooking brisket—even one aged 60 days!

Dry aging geek

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1 week 2 days ago #14611 by Simon
Replied by Simon on topic Cooking dry aged brisket
Hi All

Many thanks for your suggestions

Regards
Simon

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