Curing aged brisket?

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8 years 8 months ago #1003 by Tokerfrank
Curing aged brisket? was created by Tokerfrank
Hi my name is Tokerfrank, just registered to this forum so it is my first post. Sorry if i did not post it at the right place.

My question, i just bought this material (machine and bags) My goal is to make great smoked meat (cured) can it be done with the drybag system? I mean, if i dry age my brisket for let say, 21 days, can i cure my aged meat for 4-5 more days after to make pastrami or it would be dangerous to eat?

If there is a better way to do it just feel free to teach a newbe :)

THX Frank

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8 years 8 months ago #1004 by RRP
Replied by RRP on topic Curing aged brisket?
First, Welcome aboard, Frank!

As for aging a brisket I haven't seen that discussed before and personally have no experience to help you. OTOH any sub-primal of beef other than the leanest cuts cut will benefit from dry aging. Reason is it concentrates the beefy taste by eliminating the water plus tenderizing by breaking down the fibers. As you well know brisket can become shoe leather if dried out too much from overcooking so conversely I'd suggest shortening the Drybag aging until you have experienced your first one. Please tell us more about your method of curing it for making your pastrami. I for one am all ears!

Again, welcome aboard!

Ron

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8 years 8 months ago - 8 years 8 months ago #1005 by Tokerfrank
Replied by Tokerfrank on topic Curing aged brisket?
My curing mehod is to put it on a ziplock for 4-5 with a cure.

My cure consist in instacure 1, brown sugar, pickling salt and coriander with peppercorn.

I don't remember where, but i seen once somebody aged it for 14 days. He did not cure it.

P.S. THX for your welcome word.

Frank
Last edit: 8 years 8 months ago by Tokerfrank.

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8 years 8 months ago #1006 by RRP
Replied by RRP on topic Curing aged brisket?
We are a small family here, but growing every day!

I thank you for your recipe - I'm always hoping I will ask the right question like in those Bush Beans ads and learn the secret family recipe for pastrami handed down for like 6 generations! :laugh:

Ron

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8 years 8 months ago - 8 years 8 months ago #1007 by Tokerfrank
Replied by Tokerfrank on topic Curing aged brisket?
Actually Ron here is the real recipe if you want it.

1 Tbsp Morton Tender Quick (or Basic Dry Cure) per pound
1/2 Tbsp dark brown sugar, packed per pound
1/2 Tbsp freshly ground black pepper per pound
1 tsp granulated garlic powder per pound
1 tsp ground coriander per pound

Directions:

Trim surface fat of an untrimmed brisket flat to 1/8”, this is important so that the cure fully penetrates the meat; yet it leaves enough fat to keep the meat moist. If you do a whole brisket or thicker cut of meat, you will need to prepare a wet cure and inject the meat.
In a small bowl, mix Morton Tender Quick, sugar and remaining ingredients. Mix all ingredients well, making sure to break up any lumps of sugar, no matter how small. I found that the bare hands work best. Rub mixture into all sides of brisket, and work it in welIn a small bowl, mix Morton Tender Quick, sugar and remaining ingredients. Mix all ingredients well, making sure to break up any lumps of sugar, no matter how small. I foundl (do not shake off any excess that is on the meat). I prepared a 5 ½ pound half flat (point end), used about ¾ of the mix, and the meat was fully cured.
Next place brisket into a two gallon Ziploc bag; expel as much air as possible, and make sure the seal is secure. Refrigerate and allow to cure 4 days, turning the brisket over every 12 hours, or at least daily. After 4 days of curing, remove the brisket from the bag, and thoroughly rinse under cold running water. After rinsing, place the meat in a container and cover with cold water. Let the meat soak for 30 minutes, change the water, and let soak for another 30 minutes. This helps reduce the saltiness from the meat. Pat dry with paper towels and apply rub.
If your brisket weighs 7 pounds or more, or if it is under 7 pound but unusually thick; you will need to add an extra day to the curing time.

Dry Rub Ingredients:
3 TBS. coriander seeds (4 TBS. if you don’t have white peppercorns).
2 TBS. black peppercorns
2 TBS. yellow mustard seeds
1 TBS. white peppercorns
2 TBS. of granulated garlic
Makes enough cure for one brisket flat.

Directions:
Combine the first four ingredients, and coarsely grind in a spice grinder or coffee grinder. Pour ground mixture into a bowl, add the granulated garlic and remix. Apply the dry rub to the brisket generously, working the rub into the meat by pressing it in with the palms of your hands. Air dry in the refrigerator for 4 to 8 hours before before placing it in the smoker.
Remove brisket from the refrigerator and place it on a tray, fat side down, and place in a pre-heated Bradley Smoker, at 220 degrees F. Apply 3 hours of smoke. I used 2 hours of pecan, and finished with 1 hour of apple. Cook until the internal temperature reaches 160 – 165 degrees F. You can also use a smoking temperature of 250 degrees F.
When the brisket reaches an internal temperature of 160 – 165 degrees F, take it out of the smoker. Wrap the brisket in one layer of heavy-duty aluminum foil. Wrap it in a towel, and place it fat-side up in a cooler or microwave oven for two hours (if just going into the microwave you don't need the towel). Remove brisket from the cooler (or microwave) and remove the foil and save. Wrap brisket in plastic wrap, and then wrap it in the foil you just saved. Place in the refrigerator for at least 1 day, two is better. When ready to eat thin slice the pastrami across the grain for a tenderer slice. You can either eat it cold or warm it up.

What i gave you earlier was the basic cure recipe (substitue for morton quick)

I'M a Bradley Smoker addict. I'm thinking of 11 days of dry aging prior making the recipe. Hope it will turn out good. At least good enough to rentabilise my drybag purchase.

Frank
Last edit: 8 years 8 months ago by Tokerfrank.

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8 years 8 months ago #1008 by RRP
Replied by RRP on topic Curing aged brisket?
Mighty big THANKS there, Frank! I have it printed and stashed away - I'll have to try it after I free up some space in the frig. Ron

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