question about vacum sealer

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7 years 11 months ago - 2 years 8 months ago #1531 by costas
question about vacum sealer was created by costas
I :unsure: just ordered the LAVA vacuum sealer V100 premium, www.lava-europe.com
Is this a good choice? does it work well with the DrybagSteak bags? It is about 2.5 times more expensive compared to the retractable snorkel sealer proposed here (which I also use, but I am not so happy with the results, especially if there is some fluid in the bag, many times the case for sous vide cooking). Any idea from the experts?
Last edit: 2 years 8 months ago by .

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7 years 11 months ago #1532 by RRP
Replied by RRP on topic question about vacum sealer
I have NO knowledge of that machine which appears to be well made and highly capable for vacuum sealing - HOWEVER I question how it is any different in nature than a Food Saver brand. It appears it uses a channel type of bags which permits the air to be extracted before sealing. That type of machine will not work on the Drybag material since in spite of the bag being full of air like a balloon the Drybag material near the unit will collapse triggering your new machine into sealing. That is the reason the snorkel machine works better. OTOH given some practice and use of your new machine's tubing you should be able to extract sufficient air and then somehow seal the opening perhaps with a twisty or such.

Ron

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7 years 11 months ago #1535 by costas
Replied by costas on topic question about vacum sealer
Dear Ron,
thanks for your quick answer. I was not sure what channel sealers are. I understand from your explanation that channel bags are made so that there are "channels" left in the fabric which do not collapse when the air is sucked out of the bag. Is this the kind of bags used also by sous-vide Supreme? I got some of these for sous vide. When I looked at the Lava vacuum sealer it did not restrict the type of bags (does not explicitly specify "channel type bags"). I just looked more carefully now to the bags sold in their website and indeed they seem to be ragged. So just to make sure I got it right:
a) any non-snorkel and non-chamber type of vacuum sealer is of a channel type?
b) channel pouches are different than regular pouches because they are ragged?
In this case I can still use this for sous-vide, and use the snorkel sealer I have for the Drybag steaks. There are no fluid marinade issues there as there are in the case of sous-vide.
And a final question: the best meat for aging must have fat both on its surface AND inside? like the Kobe beef (extreme case)? we should avoid cuts that have no fat like tenderloin or other parts of the beef?

Thanks!

Costas (from Athens)

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7 years 11 months ago - 7 years 11 months ago #1536 by RRP
Replied by RRP on topic question about vacum sealer
Costas,

Please understand I have a very limited knowledge of brand names amongst vacuum sealers - given that here are some pictures which should help you understand the nature of channel bag material. This is a Food Saver bag - notice how this side of it is clear and smooth.


The other side has a bumpy texture to it so that air can be sucked out without causing the bag to collapse on to itself.


These type of bags are unlike the Drybag material which is smooth on both sides.

As for fat being needed for aging that's a bit misleading. I think a better way of explaining is that marbled fat makes the aged meat taste richer. Surface fat will be trimmed off to personal taste, but benefits the aging effort, by meaning there is no or at least less trimming loss of the red meat. Another way to think of it is a fillet or a tenderloin has little or no fat and is already tender - aging will condense the flavor but when many people trim back to red meat there is too much loss.

Ron
Last edit: 7 years 11 months ago by RRP.

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7 years 11 months ago #1537 by costas
Replied by costas on topic question about vacum sealer
I got it! I only used Drybag up to now. I guess for sous-vide the channel type is great.
Thanks for the explanations. So its more economics than taste... I thought that fat that is inside the meat gets also a richer taste by aging. Actually I thought that this was half of the rich taste we taste. But I guess fat does not change since there are no proteins there. Its just great when it is cooked for adding moisture and burning.
I plan to use sous vide for my steaks (ribeye) after 3 weeks of drying before the BBQ. Good idea?

costas

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7 years 11 months ago #1538 by RRP
Replied by RRP on topic question about vacum sealer
LOL - I'm not sure if I confused you about the fat or you just confused me! IMO no fat no taste - in fact to me fillets are bland and therefore need a tasty sauce. Yes the fat does age in the drying process and becomes richer - more so than the red meat in my opinion! As for your method of cooking your aged meat THAT will work wonderfully! You can anticipate a wonderful meal! Be sure to report back to the forum!

BTW what is our time difference? Here it's going on 3:00 in the afternoon and it is Tuesday, 11-22.
Ron

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